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Take the Icelandic Pledge

This summer Iceland is leading the way on responsible tourism with a unique online pledge for tourists.
‘The Icelandic Pledge’ is an online agreement that invites travelers to sign up to be a responsible tourist when visiting the country this Summer. 

get to know Iceland

History and Heritage

The country was settled by Norsemen from Scandinavia and Celts from the British Isles in the 9th and 10th centuries, who established the world's first parliament.

Geography

Iceland was formed around 25 million years ago, which makes it one of the youngest landmasses on the planet. Learn more about Icelandic geography and geology here.

Safe Travel

Iceland is one of the safest countries in the world. Crime rate is extremely low and medical care is excellent. However, it is necessary to take precaution when travelling in Iceland due to natural hazards caused by weather and nature, where conditions can change at a moments notice.

Volcanoes

Volcanic activity is a fact of life in Iceland, where people have learned to live with both its drawbacks, and considerable advantages, such as geothermal energy and dramatic natural environment.

People and Language

Iceland was the last country to be settled in Europe, when emigrants from Scandinavia and the British Isles first came to live on the island in the ninth and tenth century. It remains the most sparsely populated country of the continent with less than three inhabitants per square kilometer.

Practical Info

Need information on what to wear? Visa regulations or driving conditions?

explore the regions of Iceland

East

The east coast of Iceland is home to the country's largest forest, lush farmlands and a range of small fjords and islands. Thanks to the East's many natural harbors, a variety of fishing villages and small seaside communities border the coast.

West

West Iceland is one of Iceland's most geologically diverse regions. Its natural wonders are a nearly exhaustive sampling of all that Iceland has to offer, ranging from slumbering volcanos and majestic waterfalls to a variety of flora and wildlife.

Westfjords

One of Iceland's best kept secrets is undoubtedly the country's north-west corner, usually known as the Westfjords. Isolation has preserved the region in relatively unspoiled wilderness.

South

Iceland's south coast is home to some of the country's most visited tourist attractions. The coastline itself is renowned for its beauty, and the towns along the coast are famous for their fresh seafood.

North

The north of Iceland truly is a land of contrasts. Its long valleys and peninsulas are interspersed with mountains, lava fields and smooth hills carved out by rivers.

Reykjavik

With a population of 120,000, Reykjavík is not a whirlwind metropolis. Few skyscrapers grace the skyline, traffic jams are rare and faces are familiar. But don't be deceived—a steady beat of energy and events keeps the city alive and pulsing with excitement.

Reykjanes

The Reykjanes Peninsula is a geothermal wonder, where lighthouses outnumber villages. Besides hosting the Keflavík International Airport and, just a few minutes away, the spectacular Blue Lagoon, the Reykjanes Peninsula is a destination in its own right.

Highlands

For centuries, the interior of Iceland was virtually inaccessible, for years at a time playing host only to outlaws in hiding. Via the mountain roads Kjölur and Sprengisandur, the untouched wilderness of Iceland's mountainous centre is now open to the general public—for cautious exploration by foot or 4x4 vehicles—in the summer months.

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