Jump to content

20 Jan

Weronika Siodła

1 minute read

Bóndadagur

Bóndadagur

A day to pamper and celebrate the man of the house: a husband, a fiancé, or a boyfriend.

Bóndadagur literally translates as "farmer's day" in Iceland

Bóndadagur

A day to pamper and celebrate the man of the house: a husband, a fiancé, or a boyfriend.

On the 21st of January, there is a storied celebration in Iceland called Bóndadagur, which translates to "Husband's day." Traditionally, the day was dedicated to the head of the household—or farm—as Bóndadagur in Icelandic means "Farmer's day." It is a day devoted to pampering and celebrating the man of the house: a husband, a fiancé, or a boyfriend.

The men of Mánarbakki Museum

Where did the celebration originate? Bóndadagur marks the first day of Þorri, the fourth of the twelve months of the old Icelandic calendar. Þorri has been known as far back as the 12th century; its name derives from the god Þór. Icelanders have traditionally celebrated þorri since pagan times, but the tradition slowly faded after adopting Christianity.

According to the tradition, the man of the house was supposed to greet Þorri on the celebration day and welcome the beginning of a new winter month. To do that, he should exit the house wearing only his shirt and dressed in just one pant leg, and then hop around the house on one foot, all the while dragging the other pant leg behind him. While it is unknown how many Icelandic men still carry on this practice, today, Icelanders celebrate by pampering their men with gifts, a nice meal, and even flowers.

Bondadagur in Iceland

Not to worry, ladies! The month following Þorri is called Góa, and the first day is Konudagur, or "Woman's day." Just like Bóndadagur, it is a celebration of womens' essential roles in the household and has been a part of Icelandic culture for generations.

This article was written by Weronika Siodła

This article was written by Weronika Siodła

In love with Icelandic nature, good coffee and books. When I'm not exploring waterfalls, I share Iceland's best kept secrets with you. Based in Reykjavik

See more